How To Wash Your Hands To Help Stay Healthy


Hand-Hygiene-Helps-Prevent-Illness

Regular handwashing is one of the best ways to remove germs, avoid getting sick, and prevent the spread of germs to others. 

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) says that for good hand hygiene all you need is plain soap and water.

Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community.

Five simple and effective steps can help reduce the spread of illness so you, your family, your friends and the general public can stay healthy.

Handwashing is a win for everyone . . . except for the germs!


CDC recommends cleaning hands in a specific way to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others. The guidance for effective handwashing was developed based on data from a number of studies.

 

Wash often and follow these five steps every time you wash your hands!

1. Wet your hands with clean, warm running water and apply soap.

  • When dealing with cold and flu viruses, as you wash your hands the soap molecule burrows its way into the fatty envelope of a virus and literally pulls the virus apart.

2. Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. 

  • Soap and friction help lift dirt, grease, and microbes—including disease-causing germs—from the skin so they can be rinsed down the drain. 
  • Lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.

3. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds.

  • Lathering and scrubbing hands creates friction, which helps lift dirt, grease, and microbes from skin.
  • The entire hand should be scrubbed. Microbes are present on all of the wrinkly surfaces of the hand, especially under the nails.
  • How long are 20 seconds? About the amount of time it takes to hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • The ideal length of time for handwashing can depend on other factors for example, if hands are very dirty or if you are caring for someone is ill.
  • Evidence suggests that washing hands for about 15-30 seconds removes more germs from hands than washing for shorter periods.

4. Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.

  • If you are using a public restroom use a paper towel to turn off the faucet after hands have been rinsed.

5. Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them. 

To date, studies have shown that there is no added health benefit for consumers (this does not include professionals in the healthcare setting) using soaps containing antibacterial ingredients compared with using plain soap.

Information is taken from the CDC.gov website

Read our blog "Simple Soap Can Help Decrease the Spread Of Viruses"